Commissioner of Oath

Commissioners of oaths are empowered by the Province of Ontario to administer and witness the swearing of oaths or declarations. Axess Law offices have commissioners of oaths ready to commission your documents at affordable prices.

When to Use a Commissioner of Oaths

Commissioners of oaths are empowered by the Province of Ontario to administer and witness the swearing of oaths or declarations. Axess Law offices have commissioner of oaths ready to commission your documents at affordable prices.

Similar to a notarization, commissioning a signed official document (where allowed) will ensure that it is valid. When a commissioner of oaths is required, it will usually be indicated on the document around the signing area. If you’ve been asked to swear an oath or a statutory declaration, Axess Law can help.

Our commissioners of oaths are authorized by the Province of Ontario to witness and certify your oath or declaration for:

  • residency declarations
  • vehicle transfers or ownership
  • insurance claims
  • pension plans
  • statutory declarations for the government.

How It Works

01

Book Your Appointment

Click on ‘Get Started’ to submit your details. Our client care team will contact you shortly to schedule your appointment with the lawyer

02

Meet Your Lawyer

During your virtual or in-person appointment, our notary public will verify your identity using a valid government-issued photo ID. 

03

Get Your Documents

The process is completed within 5-10 minutes, in which we will verify your signature and put our official seal on the document.

Documents We Need

Photo ID is essential to verify your identity when you meet with an Axess Law commissioner of oaths. You can use any of the following:
  • Driver’s license
  • Canadian passport
  • Ontario photo card
  • Canadian citizenship card with photo
  • PR card with photo

Commission Legal Documents When It's Convenient for You

Axess Law has commissioners of oaths available 7 days a week to witness and sign your documents. They also provide remote commission by online video call. If you wish to get documents signed in person, you can stop by any of our Greater Toronto Area law offices and ask to speak with a commissioner of oaths.

Swearing an Oath in Ontario

Draft an affidavit in Ontario with Axess Law. Affidavits in Ontario require that you swear or affirm an oath stating that the information is true in the presence of a commissioner of oaths. This can be done either in the physical or virtual presence of the commissioner of oaths (doing this by a zoom call is acceptable in Ontario). Affidavits for use in court require a commissioner of oaths’ signature since you are making a legal oath testifying to the best of your knowledge that the facts in it are true. Foreign embassies and Canadian credit unions, banks, or financial institutions often ask for notarized or commissioned affidavits for the same reason.

Swearing an Affidavit of Service

Confirm a legal claim has been delivered to a party you are suing by signing and swearing an affidavit of service before an Axess Law commissioner of oath. Legal claims can be delivered by:

Handing it to the party you are suing

Leaving a copy with their lawyer, paralegal, or other legal representative

Using regular or registered mail or couriering it

Giving a copy to their business partner or corporate officer, director, or attorney for service

What Our Customers Say About Us

We are rated 4.8/5 based on 1,475 reviews.

Convenient Appointments

Make an appointment by calling +1.877.402.4207 or fill out our online booking form. Axess Law gives you the choice of booking an online or in-person appointment. Our lawyers are available 7 days a week, at times convenient for you. We can meet in person, by phone, email, or via a remote video call anywhere in Ontario. Axess Law has 5offices located across the Greater Toronto Area – all with onsite parking or easily accessible by public transit.

Some FAQs

An affidavit is like testifying in court, except it’s written. Remember that you are giving a factual account of what you know or information someone has told you (include their name). You can make a joint affidavit with others, as long as you all sign it. Use the first person (“I saw”) and a single paragraph for each fact. Number the paragraphs and use sections and a table of contents if it is long. Give exhibits such as emails a letter, starting with “A” and going to “Z” or as many letters as needed. The notary or commissioner of oaths will do the rest.
You need an affidavit in support of a claim for custody. Having decision-making responsibility for your child enables you to be involved in health care, education, religious or spiritual choices, and extracurricular activities. Your affidavit informs the judge how you plan to care for your child and why it will benefit them. It includes details about any abuse or violence your family has suffered and who live in your household. Inform the court if you have been involved in other court cases. If your child has special needs, include this in your affidavit. A notary public can witness, sign and seal your affidavit for you.

Affidavits in Ontario require that you swear or affirm an oath stating that the information is true in the presence of a commissioner of oaths. A notary public also has all of the powers of a commissioner for taking affidavits, therefore, either a notary public or commissioner of oaths can witness your oath and signature. This can be done either in the physical or virtual presence of one of these individuals (doing this by a zoom call is acceptable in Ontario). Since you are making a legal oath testifying to the best of your knowledge that the facts in it are true, affidavits for use in court require a commissioner of oaths’ signature. Foreign embassies and Canadian credit unions, banks, or financial institutions often ask for notarized or commissioned affidavits for the same reason.

Affidavits can be used in court. They are a sworn statement of facts, just as if you were testifying on a witness stand. Your statement is witnessed by a commissioner of oaths or notary public, who confirms your identity by asking you for a government-issued ID and then witnesses and signs the document. Non-court affidavits can be witnessed by a notary public or authorized commissioner of oaths as well. Statutory declarations have the same legal effect as affidavits (a sworn oath) but are mostly used for government or business matters. You might get a statutory declaration to verify you are alive for a pension plan or to make an insurance claim.
You’re the affiant when you make an affidavit. You can swear on a religious text like the Bible or Quran or declare (affirm) your affidavit is true, to the best of your knowledge.
When you make a statutory declaration, you are the declarant.

A venue is a place where a court proceeding is being held. It appears at the top of your affidavit and looks like this:

  • IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF JUSTICE – ONTARIO
  • IN THE REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
Exhibits are used to support the points you make in your affidavit. You can include bank statements, photos, emails, letters, testimonials, contracts, transcripts, or anything you think is relevant. Physical exhibits like objects or audio or videotapes can be introduced at trial, with the court’s permission. As long as the judge agrees, you may also be able to bring an exhibit to the court that you forgot to include in your affidavit. Make four copies, one each for the judge, the other party, their lawyer, and you.
Exhibits are organized in the order they appear in your affidavit. Label each one from A to Z. For example, Exhibit A might be a photocopy of a letter. Exhibit B could be a transcript of a voicemail. And so on. You can group exhibits related to a single fact together (Exhibit A-1, A-2, and A-3). When you mention an exhibit in your affidavit, add this statement after each: “now produced and shown to me and marked as Exhibit (insert the letter).” Your notary public or commissioner of oaths will witness and stamp each exhibit.

Enter Your details below: